Archive For: MCYA

Get started on your pathway to the Olympiads

The pathway to the Olympiads starts with one of two competitions. For informatics, the Australian Informatics Olympiad (AIO) is the starting point. The mathematics pathway starts with the Australian Intermediate Mathematics Olympiad (AIMO). Both of these open competitions take place in late August/early September each year.

Australian Informatics Olympiad

The AIO is a national computer programming competition held this year on Thursday 31 August.

Students write short computer programs to solve four problems that vary in difficulty. The competition does not test computer literacy or knowledge, but is focused on problem solving through programming skills. There are two papers: Intermediate for students up to Year 10, and Senior for students up to Year 12.

The AIO is suitable for students with some programming experience. In particular, you need to be able to write code that can open, read and write to files; declare variables and arrays; use loops, conditional (if) statements and simple arithmetic operations You need to know one of the following languages to participate: C, C++, C#, Java, Pascal, PHP and Python.

If you don’t know how to code, you can learn for free through Codecademy.

Australian Intermediate Mathematics Olympiad

The AIMO is a four-hour examination for students up to Year 10 level.

The AIMO is appropriate for those who have done the Gauss or Noether stage of the Enrichment stage of the MCYA, high achievers in the Australian Mathematics Competition and students who have acquired knowledge of Olympiad problem solving.

The AIMO and AIO are some of the competitions used to determine which students are selected to a number of invitation only events, including other mathematics/informatics competitions, enrichment classes and training schools. They gives talented students an opportunity to be recognised and to participate in activities which will enhance their enjoyment and knowledge of mathematics/informatics.

To enter students into either of these competitions, head to our entry page.

 

Enter MCYA Challenge now

Why not enter your maths students in a Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians (MCYA) program? Entries for MCYA Challenge are closing soon. Challenge, a problem-solving program for years 3–10, can be held during a consecutive three-week period between March and June.

Challenge comprises four problems for students in the primary levels and six problems for students in secondary levels. Groups of two or three registered students can discuss problems before each individual submits their solutions. There are separate problem sets for Middle Primary (years 3–4), Upper Primary (years 5–6), Junior (years 7–8) and Intermediate (years 9–10) students.

Don’t leave it too late, enter today via www.amt.edu.au/entry/

Closing date:

30 May

Results due:

24 June

Cost per student (including GST):

  • Primary: $18.15
  • Year 7-10: $25.30

 

* These prices apply to Australian schools only. For information about overseas pricing, please click here.

 
Have you registered for MCYA Enrichment?

Have you registered for MCYA Enrichment?

The Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians (MCYA) is a staged program designed to help teachers motivate and develop mathematically interested students in years 3–10. There are three independent stages in the MCYA: Challenge, Enrichment and the Australian Intermediate Mathematics Olympiad. You might have already registered your students for the MCYA Challenge.

Enrichment is a program held over 16 weeks within the period from April until September. It is independent of Challenge, but they have the common feature of providing challenging mathematics problems for students, as well as accessible support materials for teachers.

Enrichment comprises six parallel stages of comprehensive student and teacher support notes, for years 4–10. The stages are in order of difficulty with general year level recommendations: Ramanujan (years 4–5); Newton (years 5–6); Dirichlet (years 6–7); Euler (years 7–8); Gauss (years 8–9); Noether (very able students in years 9–10); and Polya (top 10% of Year 10). Ramanujan, Newton and Dirichlet have 8 problems, Euler and Gauss have 12 problems, and Noether and Polya have 16 problems.

Don’t miss out, register through: www.amt.edu.au/entry/

 

Are your maths students ready for a challenge?

If you are a teacher, you might be starting to identify the mathematically gifted students in your class. You are probably thinking of ways to engage these students, who invariably need more of a challenge than a school’s regular mathematics program.

Why not enter them in a Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians (MCYA) program? There are three independent stages in the MCYA: Challenge, Enrichment and the Australian Intermediate Mathematics Olympiad. Voluntary committees of Australian teachers and academics design the problems for each stage.

Now is the time to register for MCYA Challenge, which can be held during a consecutive three-week period between March and June.

Challenge comprises four problems for students in the primary levels and six problems for students in secondary levels. Groups of two or three registered students can discuss problems before each individual submits their solutions. There are separate problem sets for Middle Primary (years 3–4), Upper Primary (years 5–6), Junior (years 7–8) and Intermediate (years 9–10) students.

To learn more or register, visit: www.amt.edu.au/mathematics/mcya/

 

Attention Year 10 teachers: Polya has changed

Are you keen to extend your best Year 10 mathematics students? We are pleased to announce that Polya, the final level of Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians (MCYA) Enrichment Stage, has been completely revised.

Designed for the top 10% of mathematics students in Year 10, Polya can be run over a flexible 16-week period from April to September. It covers functions, symmetric polynomials, geometry, inequalities, functional equations, number theory, counting techniques and graph theory.

Students will receive two books: Student Notes, which provides a guided course and exercises, and the 2016 Student Problems. Teachers receive a copy of the Student Notes, Student Problems and the Teacher Guide, which contains the problems and solutions.

Results are due by 3 October and all students will receive certificates that indicate their level of achievement.

The MCYA Enrichment is independent of the earlier Challenge stage. However, both initiatives provide challenging mathematics problems for students, as well as accessible support materials for teachers.

 

New Enrichment level for years 4–5

We are introducing a new level to Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians (MCYA) Enrichment called Ramanujan. This level covers estimation, special numbers, counting techniques, fractions, clock arithmetic, ratios, colouring problems and some problem-solving techniques. Ramanujan will be the first level of MCYA Enrichment, an ideal program for capable students in years 4–5 and appropriate for students in years 6–7. It can be run over a flexible 16-week period from April to September—results will be due by 3 October. All students will receive certificates that indicate their level of achievement.

Students will receive two books: Student Problems and Student Notes, which provides related extension problems. Teachers receive a copy of the Student Notes, Student Problems and the Teacher Guide, which contains the problems and solutions.

Ramanujan is named after Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887–1920). Despite having very little formal training, Ramanujan is regarded as one of the greatest mathematicians of the 20th century. His story is so remarkable that it has been made into a movie, The Man Who Knew Infinity, starring Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionaire) and Jeremy Irons. We encourage teachers to recommend this movie to students, when it is released this year, to encourage their passion for mathematics.

We have also revised the Polya stage to cover topics including functions, symmetric polynomials, geometry, inequalities, functional equations, number theory, counting and graph theory.

The MCYA Enrichment is independent of the earlier Challenge stage. However, both initiatives provide challenging mathematics problems for students, as well as accessible support materials for teachers.