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  Two Gold Medals at IMO in Bremen

Posted Sunday 19 July 2009, updated Monday 20 July 2009.

The Australian team at the International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) in Bremen, Germany, has won two Gold medals for just the second time.

Andrew Elvey Price, of Brunswick Secondary College, Melbourne, matched the world's best students to essentially solve all 6 problems to win a Gold Medal, adding to a Silver won in 2008. He was placed overall in 10th position. Sampson Wong, of James Ruse Agricultural High School in Sydney also won a Gold Medal, adding to his Bronze of last year.

Aaron Chong, of Doncaster Secondary College in Melbourne, won a Silver Medal, in fact only 2 points off a third Gold Medal for the team, while Stacey Law, also of James Ruse, and Alfred Liang, of Trinity Grammar School in Melbourne, won Bronze Medals. Stacey's Bronze Medal was only two points short of Silver. Dana Ma, of Melbourne Girls Grammar School, was ill on day 2 and not able to add to a sound score on day 1, but earned an Honourable Mention.

[Team with Terry]

The IMO was the 50th and to celebrate many distinguished mathematicians, including former IMO Gold Medallists, attended. These included Australian Terry Tao, Gold Medallist in 1988 and the only student to ever win an IMO Gold Medal before turning 13. Terry holds a Fields Medal, considered the mathematics equivalent of the Nobel Prize. Pictured are from left Dana, Stacey, Andrew, Aaron, Terry, Alfred and Sampson.

Results of the Australian students are:

    NAME YR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6
TOT
Silver Medal   CHONG Aaron
Doncaster Secondary College VIC
11 7 7 7 2 7 0
30
Gold Medal   ELVEY PRICE, Andrew
Brunswick Secondary College VIC
12 7 6 7 5 7 5
37
Bronze Medal   LAW Stacey
James Ruse Agricultural High School NSW
11 5 7 0 7 3 0
22
Bronze Medal   LIANG Alfred
Trinity Grammar School VIC
11 7 3 0 0 7 0
17
Hon Mention   MA Dana
Melbourne Girls Grammar School VIC
12 7 4 0 0 0 0
11
Gold Medal   WONG Sampson
James Ruse Agricultural High School NSW
11 7 7 7 7 6 0
34
  TOTALS 40 34 21 21 30 5
151

(Cut-offs for Bronze, Silver and Gold were 14, 24 and 32 points respectively.)

[Sampson and Aaron]

Sampson and Andrew display their Gold Medals after the Closing Ceremony in Bremen.

Team Leader was Dr Angelo Di Pasquale of the University of Melbourne and Deputy Leader Mr Ivan Guo, from the University of New South Wales.

Australia was placed 23rd of a record 104 countries, with China in first position and Japan in second (see below for more country placings).

A further highlight was that one of the problems, Problem 1, was composed by an Australian, Ross Atkins, an IMO Bronze Medallist from 2003.

Australia's participation is administered by the Australian Mathematics Trust, a not-for-profit organisation based at the University of Canberra. Trust Executive Director Professor Peter Taylor noted that these students have reached a very high standard after years of training largely by volunteers, particularly former Olympians, led by Angelo Di Pasquale and Ivan Guo.

"They are first identified in the Australian Mathematics Competition, which is participated in by several hundreds of thousands of students of all abilities and tests basic skills as acquired at school and also to test the ability to use the mathematics they know in different contexts. Students then go on to participate in a range of activities, based in schools with teacher supervision through to more advanced work. As a result tens of thousands of students are better prepared for University study and later employment, with the IMO team the tip of the iceberg", he said.

Australia's participation at the UNESCO sanctioned (as with other Science Olympiads) IMO is sponsored by the Australian Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, whose support enables access to the program for tens of thousands of students, and the two professional societies, the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers and the Australian Mathematical Society.

These are unofficial and as we calculate. There may be errors.

1. China 221
2. Japan 212
3. Russia 203
4. South Korea 188
5. North Korea 183
6. United States of America 182
7. Thailand 181
8. Turkey 177
9. Germany 171
10. Belarus 167
11. Italy 165
11. Taiwan 165
13. Romania 163
14. Ukraine 162
15. Iran 161
15. Vietnam 161
17. Brazil 160
18. Canada 158
19. Bulgaria 157
19. Great Britain 157
19. Hungary 157
22. Serbia 153
23. Australia 151
24. Peru 144
25. Georgia 140
25. Poland 140
27. Kazakhstan 136
28. India 130
29. Hong Kong 122
30. Singapore 116
31. France 112
32. Croatia 110
33. Portugal 99
34. Turkmenistan 97
35. Argentina 93
36. Azerbaijan 91
36. Macedonia 91
38. Belgium 89
39. Colombia 88
40. Czech Republic 87
41. Greece 86
42. Uzbekistan 85
43. Indonesia 84
43. South Africa 84
45. Tajikistan 82
46. Israel 80
47. Netherlands 79
47. Switzerland 79
49. Lithuania 77
50. Mexico 74
50. Moldova 74
50. Sri Lanka 74
53. Slovakia 73
54. Mongolia 72
55. Spain 71
56. Sweden 70
57. Denmark 68
58. Bangla Desh 67
59. Austria 66
60. Luxembourg 65
61. Bosnia and Herzogovina 63
62. Latvia 61
63. Norway 60
64. Armenia 59
65. Slovenia 58
66. New Zealand 53
67. Finland 49
67. Macao 49
69. Cyprus 45
70. Chile 41
71. Estonia 40
72. Costa Rica 34
73. Kyrgizia 33
74. Morocco 32
75. Malaysia 31
76. Trinidad and Tobago 28
77. Tunisia 27
78. Ecuador 26
78. Iceland 26
78. Philippines 26
81. Albania 24
81. Honduras 24
83. Montenegro 23
83. Puerto Rico 23
85. Cuba 21
85. Liechtenstein 21
85. Pakistan 21
85. Uruguay 21
89. Ireland 20
90. Nigeria 17
91. Cambodia 14
91. Guatemala 14
91. Paraguay 14
94. El Salvador 13
94. Venezuela 13
96. Panama 12
97. Bolivia 9
98. Mauritania 8
99. Syria 7
100. Zimbabwe 5
101. Benin 3
101. Kuwait 3
101. United Arab Emirates 3
104. Algeria 2

Peter Taylor
Sunday 19 July 2009

 

 
 
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